Math drives more careers than imaginable


By Marisa Caban

Chief Photographer–

 

Math Awareness Month was honored on April 14 in the Tinker Terrance Room. Andrea Xeriland, coordinator of the Mathematics Department, hosted the Math Awareness Month talk titled “Math Drives Careers.”

Professors of Cybersecurity, Sociology, Music and Meteorology programs spoke about math, how it affects their careers and presented their experiences with math.

Director of Cybersecurity Ken Dewey talked about how math is important in the fields of forensics, encryption and coding.

Professor Steve Carano explains math equations used in programming weather radar technology in the Math Drives Careers workshop. (Photo by Marisa Caban)

Professor Steve Carano explains math equations used in programming weather radar technology in the Math Drives Careers workshop. (Photo by Marisa Caban)

“There’s so many people out there who can’t do basic math,” Dewey said.

Professors expressed math is not complicated; not all students need advanced math classes. Meteorology professor Steve Carano discussed some of the complex equations that are the roots for storm tracking technology.

“(In meteorology) we have computers to crunch high amounts of data, but we need someone to program these computers,” Carano said. “We need bright young minds, like you guys, along with computers and math.”

Professor of Sociology Tara Hall presents her math and sociology presentation at the Math Drives Careers workshop. (Photo by Marisa Caban)

Professor of Sociology Tara Hall presents her math and sociology presentation at the Math Drives Careers workshop. (Photo by Marisa Caban)

Arts and social sciences are sometimes viewed as requiring less math, which Tracey Gregg-Boothby, professor of Music, proved wrong.

“One of the ways we use math in music is with duration … measuring sound and silence,” Gregg-Boothby said.

Gregg-Boothby’s Prezi presentation showed such math in musical form with time measurements and notes and their duration.

Social Sciences professor Tara Hall told about how math and sociology are “married” with statistics and research.

“I hated math; I was one of those people who was like ‘I’m going to be a sociologist, I won’t need math,’ until my first statistics course,” Hall said.

Hall explained quantitative research in sociology, which is widely used in research, and involves “lots of numbers” and statistical analyses.

Various faculty explained at the event that math is important to learn, it is not limited to the STEM fields, but branches out to many different kinds of careers.

A drawing was held for a MyMathLab access code and the winner was student Caitlyn Tiede.

 

Free math help and tutoring are available in the Science and Math building Room 121 Monday-Friday 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.

 

 

 

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